Jesse Porter’s (13th Census of the United States - Indian Population - Township 5, California) daughter, Lucie Porter (13th Census of the United States - Indian Population - Township 5, California) with George Cooper Porter (“Domesticated Indian” - 1880 United States Federal Census - Birthplace: California) had Susie Porter (Indian - U.S., Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940 - Jackson, California) and with William E Davis (Digger, U.S., Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940 - Jackson, California) they had Frank Porter Sr. (Index to Census Roll of Indians, 1928-1933), who married Evelyn Ellen Porter Nasha (1933 California Indian Judgement Roll & Index to Census Roll of Indians, 1928-1933). Frank Sr. and Evelyn had Frank Edward Porter, Jr. in Jackson, CA who married Claire Elaine Melville (White.) They had April Porter (1972 California Indian Judgement Roll) and with Larry Mann (White) had me, Desiree Porter Kane née Mann.

William Davis’ parents are John Patrick (Digger, U.S., Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940 - Jackson, California) and HN Hooper (Settler).

John Patrick’s parents are Humboldt Joe ( Paiute - U.S., Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940 - Nevada) and Mollie Joe (Digger - U.S., Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940 - Jackson, California born in the 1830s).

Evelyns parents are Joseph Nasha aka Enich Naccio (Index to Census Roll of Indians, 1928-1933) and Lizzie Thompson (Indian, 1900 United States Federal Census).

Joseph Nasha’s parents are Emilio Naccio  / (Chicken Ranch Miwok & Toulumne, via his mom Susannah Naccio) and Alice Nash (Digger 1900 united states federal census)



“Any person could go before a Justice of Peace to obtain Indian children for indenture. The Justice determined whether or not compulsory means were used to obtain the child. If the Justice was satisfied that no coercion occurred, the person obtain a certificate that authorized him to have the care, custody, control and earnings of an Indian until their age of majority (for males, eighteen years, for females, fifteen years)."[10] In actual practice this section lead to a trade system of kidnapped Indian children, either stolen from their parents or taken from the results of militia attacks during the 1850s and 1860s. Frontier whites often eagerly paid $50–$100 for Indian children to apprentice and so groups of kidnappers would often raid isolated Indian villages, snatching up children in the chaos of battle.

In an 1867 analysis done for the Secretary of War,[14] it was noted that the rapid advancement of white settlements had greatly limited the sources of fish, wild fowl, game, nuts and roots. At that point, the Indians were forced into collisions with the whites and often needed to choose between stealing or starvation. By 1870, the population had declined from 40,000 at the time of the United States acquisition of California to 20,000. Thousands of Indians had been murdered, raped or sold into slavery.[15] Later in 1900, the Native American population in California was reported to be around 16,000.[16]” - Wikipedia